How Leopards, Hippopotamuses, and 3 Other Animals Got Their Names

All animals were named by scientists. In this article, learn how leopards, hippos, and eight other animals got their names.

Leopards:

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

“Leopard” itself means “lion-panther.” “Leon” is the Greek and Latin name for “Lion,” while “pard” is an Ancient-Greek word that now means “panther” or “leopard”

Hippopotamuses:

Photo by Follow Alice on Pexels.com

Did you know that the word “hippo” or “hippopotamus” actually means “river horse” in Ancient Greek? “ἵππος” in greek means horse and is pronounced íppos. “ποταμός” means river and is pronounced potamós. Put the two together and you get íppos-potamós which roughly sounds like Hippopotamus. Read more from hippopedia.home.blog

Platypuses:

pen_ash on Pixabay

Platypuses have flat feet, which is exactly why their name is a Greek translation of “flat-footed:” πλατύπους, pronounced platýpous.

Octopuses:

Photo by Pia on Pexels.com

Octopuses have eight tentacles. Similar to the platypus, octopus means eight-footed in Greek. A direct translation would be οκταπόδι, pronounced oktapódi.

Bald Eagles:

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Bald eagles might seem wrongly named because they are not actually bald, but that’s not why they were named that. The Anglo-Saxon (Old English) word for white is “balde” and bald eagles have white heads.

Thank you for reading this article.

[New: Read about the 57,000 year old wolf pup buried under ice that was recently discovered, Read about the worlds only white puma caught on camera] You might also like:

Cheetah

Cheetahs are well known for their speed and can be found in Africa’s savannahs and deserts. It is the only big cat that has no ability to roar…

Honeybee

There are three classes of honeybees: the queen, the workers, and the drones. Most often, a single queen is living in the hive and it lays eggs for new bees to be born…


References:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s